Københavns Lufthavn udvidelse T3 af Vilhelm Lauritzen Arkitekter
Københavns Lufthavn udvidelse T3 af Vilhelm Lauritzen Arkitekter

The flight begins with skylight, green shafts and a 270-meter view

18. March 2019

A €530-million expansion of Copenhagen Airport is underway to accommodate 40 million annual passengers. It will be the largest project in the history of the airport. Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects and Zeso Architects designed the proposal with a focus on nature, daylight and urban life. The project team also include COWI and Aarsleff, who is turnkey contractor.

Nature, urban life and daylight are key elements in the proposal for the new 80,000 m2 expansion of the airport. With a €530-million budget, it will be one of Denmark’s largest construction projects. The new space becomes equally spectacular and simple and with strong references to Denmark and the Nordics in general.

“Copenhagen Airport is one of Denmark’s most popular buildings, and most Danes share a bond with the airport that goes far beyond function. The new building will get a clear and easily recognizable identity and become a showroom for the best of Denmark. The vision is a one-roof-terminal that draws in nature, the city and the light,” says Thomas Scheel, partner of Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects and lead of the proposal in corporation with Zeso Architects.

The terminal unite under a wavy ceiling that lets diffuse light into the vast space with a strong reference to clouds in the sky. Open, green light shafts with hanging plants serve as crevices in the transparent ceiling ensuring a simultaneous flow of direct sunlight and diffuse daylight. In the evening, the ceiling appears as a unifying surface reflecting a starry sky. The three light shafts run down all floors and illuminate the new baggage delivery. The combination of these architectural elements ensure that everything is within easy reach in a quiet and characterful room

Characterful floors and ceilings are generally an architectural trait of Copenhagen Airport. The expansion naturally combines existing architectural expressions and creates a well-functioning, quiet and characterful space where everything is within reach.

The heart of the terminal becomes an open, bright urban square with a large garden that provides easy wayfinding to passengers and a nice view of the runways through the 270-meter window section. Starting at the square is a main flow with shops and alongside the façade; passengers will enjoy restaurants, food trucks and shops. The three green light shafts become landmarks and meeting places and offer a look at the other floors.

A hanging column-free deck divides the space into two independent levels and unites the architecture of Terminal 2 and Terminal 3 making the extension a natural and integral part of CPH.

“The proposal is based on a coherent architectural concept that breaks this gigantic space into small chunks of presence and calmness. It provides attention to all areas,” says Thomas Scheel, partner in Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects.

Technically, the proposal presents an operational and modular system with clear design principles, logical locations of critical functions and future expansion potentials. There is focus on the well-being of all users, sustainability and efficient building operations. A team consisting of Aarsleff, Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects, Zeso Architects and Cowi will carry out the project.

The first stage of the construction is expected to be completed in 2023. The second stage in 2028.

The flight begins with skylight, green shafts and a 270-meter view
The flight begins with skylight, green shafts and a 270-meter view
Vilhelm Lauritzen står bag udvidelse af CPH
The flight begins with skylight, green shafts and a 270-meter view
×